Category Archives: Professor Liang’s classes

McMindfulness: How Mindfulness Became the New Capitalist Spirituality (Repeater Books) NB Buddhist Studies

Gloablisation and all classes. i wonder how other major faith practices would have reacted to a book-cover taking their main spiritual leader and/or deity and adding this “art work” of Mr. McDonald to her/his likeness? i myself am a free speech militant, so am not thinking about protesting or banning or anything like that — though i did sigh and make a face. for our classes the larger point is the dollar sign at the core of globalisation (and hence, our age) that i put on our blackboard — everything can be bought and sold, everything can be monetised and commodified, even religious concepts like “mindfulness” …. and because the world has become globalised, one part of the globe, the wealthier side, can easily borrow (take? steal?) religious or other ideas from poorer parts of the globe. i haven’t read the book yet, but i am guessing the “Mc” is a shot not just at the capitalism of it, but also the distortion, superficiality — much like fast food is sort of food but also a superficial, lesser version. and the phrase “capitalist spirituality” is really interesting to me, well worth thinking of other examples. and remember, in our classes we resist and disobey this push towards either/or’s — on a global scale phenomenon like this must be critically analyzed. on the other hand, to me, if individuals in the West receive solace from even the most watered down versions of mindfulness, then i am glad for this. Professor Liang

MCMINDFULNESS: How Mindfulness Became the New Capitalist Spirituality (Repeater Books)

Ronald E. Purser, “McMindfulness: How Mindfulness Became the New Capitalist Spirituality” (Repeater Books, 2019)

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OK… Chiles en Nogada, at last! Pati Jinich Mexican Table

Globalisation. humans migrate. globalisation has accelerated the rate of involuntary migration while at the same time connected more of us to one another via various information superhighways. so here is a particular dish tied to the seasonality of produce (a sense of about food and time and place very much being wiped out by globalisation ….), missed by those who migrated, appreciated by those not of these regions by virtue of their immigrant friends and neighbors and this globalisation information superhighway. add in memories, elders, ancestors, families, friends, neighborhoods, traditional markets …. ceremonies, rituals …. and you have in one brief essay, one dish, one food item, a perfect illustration of why we have organized our semester the way we have. Professor Liang

OK… Chiles en Nogada, at last! Pati Jinich Mexican Table

OK… Chiles en Nogada, at last!

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Why Young Black Chefs Need Black Mentors: Eater

Globalization. is food just about food? as we have already outlined during our first session, of course not — it is about history, family, memory, the economy, migration, culture, identity, career …. gender roles, social class, tradition, faith …. the list is nearly infinite. for our class, we use it as a microcosm — case study — on the one hand super accessible — all humans require food; and super flexible — you pick and choose which of these facets to use to connect your particular food and foodways to the broader, global patterns we are studying. Professor Liang

Why Young Black Chefs Need Black Mentors

https://www.eater.com/young-guns-rising-stars/2019/9/5/20841119/mentorship-black-chefs-hospitality-scholarships-programs

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Historians Reveal Multiple Cradles Of Civilization Each Independently Developed Chicken Tender Basket: The Onion

Historiography and Globalisation. well, not quite what i had in mind based on our sessions this week, though i had a good chuckle this morning reading this article. bonus for the classic old school textbook illustrations of these ancient chicken tender baskets …. 🙂 in all seriousness though — for world historians the issue of whether certain things — written language, pottery, etc. — are independently developed (and if so, why ….) versus learned/borrowed are as controversial as the fundamental issues we have discussed (linear versus circular; individuals make history versus history making individuals ….) for Globalisation, these global food/foodways patterns — poor people food, dumplings, meat wrapped in some type of bread, sausages, noodles, soup — are the microcosms we use to access global and historical patterns and characteristics of globalisation. The Onion started at Madison Wisconsin when i was a student there, and they have had a long history of writers taking class material and turning them into articles. Professor Liang

Historians Reveal Multiple Cradles Of Civilization Each Independently Developed Chicken Tender Basket

https://www.theonion.com/historians-reveal-multiple-cradles-of-civilization-each-1837972320

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Apple’s streaming service is cheap, but how does it stack up against Amazon, Netflix and Disney? : Marketwatch

Poli Sci and Globalization. Imperialism, exclusive knowledge, power, resources. if we were to add up all of the billions available from this list of mostly north American/US companies, what percentage of the globe’s total annual “cultural production” budget would that be? the power to narrate — to include and exclude, to interpret and misinterpret — trumps every other form of power. as i often note in classes, not that one form of imperialism is better than another — physical-economic-political imperialism one can fight and resist and easily see when victory appears; cultural imperialism — much much more complicated and difficult to process and handle. Professor Liang

Apple’s streaming service is cheap, but how does it stack up against Amazon, Netflix and Disney?

https://www.marketwatch.com/story/apples-streaming-service-is-cheap-but-how-does-it-stack-up-against-amazon-netflix-and-disney-2019-09-11?mod=mw_latestnews

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