Category Archives: World History and Global Studies

Review of The Historian’s Toolbox: A Student’s Guide to the Theory and Craft of History Third Edition by Robert C. Williams

Leave a comment

Filed under The Middle Ground Journal, World History and Global Studies

The Middle Ground Journal and the College of St. Scholastica

L1040397u

 

A warmer week at the Home Office of The Middle Ground Journal …. We celebrate the weekend with a photo of our host institution, The College of St. Scholastica, Duluth, Minnesota, USA.

The Middle Ground Journal: World History and Global Studies is a scholarly, teaching journal housed at The College of St. Scholastica and published by the Midwest World History Association, an affiliate of the World History Association. We have successfully expanded our issues, publishing weekly from September to June — a significant increase in the workload of our all volunteer staff. Now we gear up for the next batch of books and documentaries for review — as well as requests for new books. We have now integrated undergraduate student interns into this process, giving them unprecedented insight into the publishing, reviewing, and scholarly process.

For more information on The Middle Ground Journal, please visit https://www.facebook.com/middlegroundjournal and http://www2.css.edu/app/depts/HIS/historyjournal/index.cfm For a recent article on The Middle Ground’s undergraduate interns’ excellent work, published in the American Historical Association’s Perspectives on History, see: http://www.historians.org/perspectives/issues/2013/1305/Opening-The-Middle-Ground-Journal.cfm

Please address all inquiries to the journal’s chief editor Professor Hong-Ming Liang at HLIANG@CSS.EDU

1 Comment

Filed under World History and Global Studies

The North Star Project, 2013-2014 Report Number Nineteen — Food, a different perspective of The USA, Ana María Camelo Vega

The North Star Reports: Global Citizenship and Digital Literacy

The North Star Project, 2013-2014 Report Number Nineteen — Food, a different perspective of The USA, Ana María Camelo Vega

Living over two months in the USA allows me to see a different perspective of the country, and how many issues are involved and developed in the inside. Indeed, diverse aspects, including food, clothing, recreation, government and politics, education, language, religion, transportation, economy, environment and finally, culture and arts, can define and determine in an accurate way what American culture is all about.

anamaria 2

Talking about the food, it is pretty difficult to define American food, as it may be really expansive. It is certainly true that American culture has some typical dishes, but it can be said that it is a melting pot of different cultures as well. Nevertheless, even though you face different and diverse types of food, I can truly say that there is a kind of American…

View original post 449 more words

1 Comment

Filed under The North Star Reports, World History and Global Studies

US Foreign Relations Spring 2014

IMG_0618u

Leave a comment

by | November 14, 2013 · 10:56 am

The North Star Project, 2013-2014 Report Number Eighteen — Durga Punja in Eastern India, by Srijita Kar

The North Star Reports: Global Citizenship and Digital Literacy

The North Star Project, 2013-2014 Report Number Eighteen — Durga Puja in Eastern India, by Srijita Kar

The word Puja stands for worship. Durga puja, the worship of goddess Durga, is one of the biggest celebrations in the Eastern part of India. It is known by various names in different states. In the Western part of India it is called Navratri and in the North it is known as Dusshera. It is nine days long celebration and the start is marked by Mahalaya which is a day prior to the first day of the puja. The word Mahalaya stands for the great beginning. On the day of Mahalaya people wake up at four in the morning to listen to the recital of the great victory of goddess Durga on the radio.

srijita 1

The first three days of the celebration is mostly bringing the statues of goddess Durga and her children (who…

View original post 1,189 more words

1 Comment

Filed under The North Star Reports, World History and Global Studies