Category Archives: World History and Global Studies

The Middle Ground Journal and The College of St. Scholastica

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Snow at the Home Office of The Middle Ground Journal …. We celebrate the weekend with a photo of our host institution, The College of St. Scholastica, Duluth, Minnesota, USA.

The Middle Ground Journal: World History and Global Studies is a scholarly, teaching journal housed at The College of St. Scholastica and published by the Midwest World History Association, an affiliate of the World History Association. We have successfully expanded our issues, publishing weekly from September to June — a significant increase in the workload of our all volunteer staff. Now we gear up for the next batch of books and documentaries for review — as well as requests for new books. We have now integrated undergraduate student interns into this process, giving them unprecedented insight into the publishing, reviewing, and scholarly process.

For more information on The Middle Ground Journal, please visit https://www.facebook.com/middlegroundjournal and http://www2.css.edu/app/depts/HIS/historyjournal/index.cfm For a recent article on The Middle Ground’s undergraduate interns’ excellent work, published in the American Historical Association’s Perspectives on History, see: http://www.historians.org/perspectives/issues/2013/1305/Opening-The-Middle-Ground-Journal.cfm

Please address all inquiries to the journal’s chief editor Professor Hong-Ming Liang at HLIANG@CSS.EDU

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The North Star Project, 2013-2014 Report Number Seventeen — Dresden, Germany, by Megan Hennen

The North Star Reports: Global Citizenship and Digital Literacy

The North Star Project, 2013-2014 Report Number Seventeen — Dresden, Germany, by Megan Hennen

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In the northeastern state of Saxony, Germany, you can find the city of Dresden.  This once soviet-occupied used to be nothing more to me than the setting for Kurt Vonnegut’s anti-war novel, Slaughterhouse-Five.  And then, I was there.  Standing in the middle of Dresden’s Altstadt (old city), looking up and admiring at all of the blackened facades.  There’s a kind of beauty about the charred buildings, but there’s also no denying that it has a haunting quality, too.  In the middle of February 1945, WWII had been inching closer to its end, when the Allied forces released their disastrous cargo, which would not only leave Dresden in ruins, but also killing thousands of civilians.  These scorched structures serve as a reminder of this event, a sort of memorial for the lost lives of the fire raids. …

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The North Star Project, 2013-2014 Report Number Sixteen — Picnic in the Mongolian Countryside, by Gina Sterk

The North Star Reports: Global Citizenship and Digital Literacy

The North Star Project, 2013-2014 Report Number Sixteen — Picnic in the Mongolian Countryside, by Gina Sterk

Picnic in the Mongolian Countryside

A few weekends ago I joined the staff of all language departments of my university for their annual countryside picnic.

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I was told to be at the school at 9 am, although the first hour or so of the day was spent sitting on a bus waiting for everyone who got the memo, which I missed, that there is no reason to come on time.  More and more teachers (on “Mongolian time”) trickled onto the bus throughout the hour, all of which were in great moods and untroubled by their lateness as I would have been.

At some point it was mysteriously determined that we had waited long enough, and the bus finally rolled out of the parking lot.  As soon as it did so, the bus’s karaoke…

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The North Star Project, 2013-2014 Report Number Fifteen — Studying Abroad: A Cultural Challenge, by Ana Maria Camelo Vega

The North Star Reports: Global Citizenship and Digital Literacy

The North Star Project, 2013-2014 Report Number Fifteen — Studying Abroad: A Cultural Challenge, by Ana Maria Camelo Vega

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Around one in 35 people in the world today are migrants. This has led to an increase in cultural diversity and cultural exchanges all around the world. On August of this year, I became part of this global phenomenon. I flew all the way from Colombia, South America, to Houston, TX. There, I had to take another flight to Chicago, IL; where I had to take another flight right to Duluth, MN. Arriving here was a whole personal challenge. The United States of America is an ethnically and racially diverse country in many different ways. In this way, its culture is completely different to my home country’s culture in different aspects. The one that is going to be explained in this post is the conception of oneself and his relationship with…

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