Why Young Black Chefs Need Black Mentors: Eater

Globalization. is food just about food? as we have already outlined during our first session, of course not — it is about history, family, memory, the economy, migration, culture, identity, career …. gender roles, social class, tradition, faith …. the list is nearly infinite. for our class, we use it as a microcosm — case study — on the one hand super accessible — all humans require food; and super flexible — you pick and choose which of these facets to use to connect your particular food and foodways to the broader, global patterns we are studying. Professor Liang

Why Young Black Chefs Need Black Mentors

https://www.eater.com/young-guns-rising-stars/2019/9/5/20841119/mentorship-black-chefs-hospitality-scholarships-programs

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Historians Reveal Multiple Cradles Of Civilization Each Independently Developed Chicken Tender Basket: The Onion

Historiography and Globalisation. well, not quite what i had in mind based on our sessions this week, though i had a good chuckle this morning reading this article. bonus for the classic old school textbook illustrations of these ancient chicken tender baskets …. 🙂 in all seriousness though — for world historians the issue of whether certain things — written language, pottery, etc. — are independently developed (and if so, why ….) versus learned/borrowed are as controversial as the fundamental issues we have discussed (linear versus circular; individuals make history versus history making individuals ….) for Globalisation, these global food/foodways patterns — poor people food, dumplings, meat wrapped in some type of bread, sausages, noodles, soup — are the microcosms we use to access global and historical patterns and characteristics of globalisation. The Onion started at Madison Wisconsin when i was a student there, and they have had a long history of writers taking class material and turning them into articles. Professor Liang

Historians Reveal Multiple Cradles Of Civilization Each Independently Developed Chicken Tender Basket

https://www.theonion.com/historians-reveal-multiple-cradles-of-civilization-each-1837972320

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Apple’s streaming service is cheap, but how does it stack up against Amazon, Netflix and Disney? : Marketwatch

Poli Sci and Globalization. Imperialism, exclusive knowledge, power, resources. if we were to add up all of the billions available from this list of mostly north American/US companies, what percentage of the globe’s total annual “cultural production” budget would that be? the power to narrate — to include and exclude, to interpret and misinterpret — trumps every other form of power. as i often note in classes, not that one form of imperialism is better than another — physical-economic-political imperialism one can fight and resist and easily see when victory appears; cultural imperialism — much much more complicated and difficult to process and handle. Professor Liang

Apple’s streaming service is cheap, but how does it stack up against Amazon, Netflix and Disney?

https://www.marketwatch.com/story/apples-streaming-service-is-cheap-but-how-does-it-stack-up-against-amazon-netflix-and-disney-2019-09-11?mod=mw_latestnews

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Food and the World – Family, Hospitality, Friendship Across National Boundaries through Food – by Cassie Mahlberg. The North Star Reports: Global Citizenship and Digital Literacy, at NorthStarReports.org and facebook.com/NorthStarReports

The North Star Reports: Global Citizenship and Digital Literacy

Food and the World – Family, Hospitality, Friendship Across National Boundaries through Food – by Cassie Mahlberg. The North Star Reports: Global Citizenship and Digital Literacy, at NorthStarReports.org and facebook.com/NorthStarReports

[Fresh salad, plate of couscous with fried onions. First meal I cooked in Oslo]

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Will AI replace university lecturers? Not if we make it clear why humans matter: The Guardian

Poli Sci and all classes. well, my sarcastic-ish initial reaction is “Hey, my students probably would prefer a robot over me ….”, and (see illustration) i would certainly hope our future robot AI professors would have better clothing than that. two sessions in and we have already had some very excellent ideas discussed about the promises and limitations of modern technology — not either/or, but for what purpose, when and how, and that big question i asked — are we using technology, or is technology using us? here, a broader, deeper connection to what we discussed Thursday — if the core engine driving globalisation is economic — and more specific, profit making, then a companion to that big question is, are we using AI robot professors because they make life better, more humane, more satisfying, or is it because it is yet another way to squeeze every last dollar out of the means of production? at the end of our Thursday session our classmate Anna asked about how much technology versus in person contact i use for networking — and in my answer i spoke basically of something inherently human — subjective, random-ish, intuitive — not a line of computer code, but something that comes from a human’s brain/soul. with emphasis on the idea that i am always actively thinking about the technology choices i am making, rather than passively letting technology designs dictate what and when i use them. while i have been experimenting with online teaching, because we are all being pressed in that direction, and because i am interested in technology, i am also skeptical of squeezing even more actual direct human interactions out of our lives. nor am i convinced that investing in more technology and machines will actually become profitable in the long run. in any case, always promising and fun to see an article appear relating to what we just discussed in class — and for Globalisation and Historiography, expect these ideas/themes to appear all semester as well. Professor Liang

Will AI replace university lecturers? Not if we make it clear why humans matter

https://www.theguardian.com/education/2019/sep/06/will-ai-replace-university-lecturers-not-if-we-make-it-clear-why-humans-matter

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